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News & Info

News and information posts that are either about Half Moon Bay or have an impact on residents of Half Moon Bay.

Translate This Feature

Since we have a diverse community from many nationalities and cultures I have included in our website a Translation feature. It was installed about a year ago in the right column, but I have had no feedback as to it's value to the community that reads our website.

I have added a poll to this post in order to determine the features value to you so if you don't mind answering this question with the best answer I would appreciate it.

Garage Sale Advice from Health Canada

Garage Sale season has officially begun and Health Canada is aware that many communities in Ottawa and surrounding areas are hosting neighbourhood garage sales.

Health Canada has a number of online resources to help guide people when deciding what to buy or sell during these events. It is important to note that everyone holding a garage sale is legally responsible to ensure that products being sold meet current safety standards.

Here are a number links that include helpful information and tips for sellers/buyers:

Garage Sale Safety  http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/ahc-asc/media/advisories-avis/_2009/2009_68-eng.php

Facts for Garage Sale Vendors http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/cps-spc/pubs/cons/garage-eng.php

Second-Hand Products & Garage Sales http://hc-sc.gc.ca/cps-spc/house-domes/used-usages/index-eng.php

White Grubs – Pest Note

White Grubs - What are they?

White grubs are the larvae of certain beetles, such as June beetles and chafers. Grubs are one of the most difficult lawn pests to deal with. Grubs are white or yellowish and have fleshy, wrinkled, C-shaped bodies with tan or brown heads and six spiny legs. They are quite small upon hatching, but at maturity are from 2 to 4 cm (3/4 to 1 1/2 inches), depending on the species.

The most common white grubs infesting turf in Canada are those of the native June beetle or Junebug.  Two smaller exotic species, the European chafer and the Japanese beetle have been accidentally introduced into Canada and are found primarily in the Niagara peninsula.  The European chafer however, has recently migrated further north and east, and is responsible for much of the lawn damage in recent years in eastern Ontario.  June beetle adults are shiny reddish brown, up to 2.5 cm (1 inch) long. The adult European Chafer is light brown or tan and is about 1.3 cm (0.5 inch) long. The adult Japanese beetle is metallic green and bronze, about 1 cm (less than 0.5 inch) long.

Signs of grub infestation.

Grubs feed on the roots of many plants, but prefer the fibrous roots of lawn grass. As the roots are destroyed, turf will wilt and turn brown. They also feed on potatoes and carrots in the garden. They cut the main stems or roots of plants below the soil surface, and tunnel into tubers and freshly rooted plants. Affected areas will feel soft and spongy to walk on, and turf in these spots can be lifted up with ease. Carefully fold back the turf and observe the number of grubs exposed. Damage is most severe in the spring and fall when moisture levels in the soil are high. During drier periods, the eggs may be killed and surviving larvae can be found deeper in the soil. Extremely dry summers destroy many eggs, and newly hatched grubs. Mature grubs can be found near the surface in late summer and early fall. Often skunks and other small mammals will pull back the turf to feed on grubs in the spring or fall. This secondary damage to your lawn, as well as flocks of starlings and blackbirds feeding on the lawn, are signs of a grub infestation. If you have any of these natural predators digging at your grass, check for white grubs. Many people notice these indicators first.

Read the full article at: http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/cps-spc/pubs/pest/_pnotes/whgrub-versblancs/index-eng.php

Download the Grub Pest Note flyer

Open Air Fire By-Law

I was asked the other day about open air fires and whether or not it is allowed in the city.  I didn't have the answer to this question but today I did find the Ottawa By-Law that pertains to this question.  In short, no we are not allowed to have open air fires in Half Moon Bay.  As you can see in the image below, the shaded areas are a no Open Air Fire permit allowed zone.  This means BBQ's are okay for cooking but not a fire-pit or any other type of fire.

You can read more about this by-law at City of Ottawa